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20110701
20110731
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Book TV 30
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CSPAN2 30
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English 30
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jul 3, 2011 3:00pm EDT
is an open minded scholar. who embraces big ideas who's not encapsulated by silos or artificial boundaries. he's clarifies as he pursues nuance and complexity. don't be fooled by the fact that this book and after the cohen says from prehistoric times to the french revolution. professor fukuyama takes you through the state, counter, and government, and what's the origin. having one of those in place doesn't suppose that the others will have vibrant and alive institutions. he discusses failed and failing states, provides probing questions ab the -- about the united states as well. i love the fact that you defend the necessity of politics even as you take us through political anxiety and political decay and it makes us think about our own society here in the united states. i have not read the whole book yet. but i've already been made to think for me unreconstructed and open-minded liberal you helped me realize there's more than friedrich hayek that market absolutism. let us welcome francis fukuyama and -- [applause] [applause] >> let's also pay tribute to the good work of c-span which adds t
CSPAN
Jul 18, 2011 7:00am EDT
professor with the big ears and a funny name. now all bets are off. obama just might be willing to be the next president of the united states. it would be the capstone of an amazing rise for a politician whose charisma and personal story. the harvard educated has breezed life into the democratic party. at the heart of obama is his personality and presence. part preacher and professor and part movie star. his charisma seems effortless, his charm and afterthought. who is that guy? he certainly got it. he describes obama as the third african-american since reconstruction to serve in the senate. he delivered the keynote address at the 2004 national convention and won a grammy for the audio version of his memoir and he said he need look no farther than his desk in the senate chamber to be reminded of the last politician who embody the hopes of a generation, designed by its previous occupant including bobby kennedy. with that here we are today. conservatives, as we all know as late as last week, conservatives are questioning whether he was born, the degree to which progressives who ar
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2011 1:00pm EDT
dream. he was a standard. he was a big star. he became the social leader of all the co-ops at the entrance and then he fell in love with a young intern, and we've all done something stupid out of love. what he did was he stole a 600-pound safe full of moon rocks from his professor's office, and as i said, spread them on the bed, had sex with his girlfriend and then try to sell them over the internet to a belgian gem dealer. >> his name was? >> axel. you couldn't have invented this guy. [laughter] this guy has never been out of antwerp is like. he collects rocks and treats them every monday night in issued center where all the guys in antwerp trade rocks. his hobby is popinjay which i had never heard of which is a sport where there's a wooden bird on a 100-foot pole and all these men stand around and shoot crossbows. this is a real sport. use this guy and he seized his hat on the internet, i've got moon rocks for sale, and he is this big believer in right and wrong sweetie immediately called the fbi. e-mail the fbi in tab and he became this big sting operation. thad robe
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2011 8:15am EDT
.i. joe," the lakers and the celtics in the championship. apple wuss big, then it -- was big, then it went away for a while, then it was back again. so it should be obvious that the 1980s is back, and for various reasons i argue in the book, it is back. and i don't think it's just because of the nostalgia factor although that's certainly a factor. also there's some coincidences. i had mentioned on my radio show a couple days ago that the weird coincidence, although you may see it not just as a coincidence, that 25 years ago almost to the exact week and, certainly, to the exact month the united states military was bombing libya, and the world was wrapped with the detention about a nuclear meltdown at chernobyl. those two things happened almost exactly 25 years ago to the month. so as much of this is pop culture, some of it is very, very real. and what i argue in the book is that the popular culture of the 1980s, the iconography of the 1980s in many ways has inspired the way we hook at real world -- look at real world events and how real world, i guess you would call them actors, behave toda
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2011 3:00pm EDT
are no longer serious about solving big problems. and that was sort of the subject of my first book in 2007 looking ahead to the 2008 presidential race. and the big issues in education, and health care, and energy, the environment and jobs, and so on, and i think that you can really see that playing out in washington right now as we have this debate about the budget. and that this budget debate in some ways has become about paul ryan and his plan and his thinking of the budget. but that the idea that we as a nation can all agree that there is one guy in washington talking seriously about the budget is an indictment of everyone else in congress who is not, that we're sort of at this point where you want to talk about the budget? there's one guy is taking this really seriously. he's the one who's thinking about how to solve the budget problem. these are huge issues. generational issues that are going to have to be solved one way or another. and the fact that there's not a larger debate that involves more people on both sides of the aisle i think is a stunning indictment of where we are in a p
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2011 7:00pm EDT
was a stand out, big star, he came became the social leader of all of the co-op and interns. then he fell in love with young intern. we have all done something sometime out of love. he stole a 600 pound safe full of moon rocks from his professors office. as i said, spread them on the bed, had sex with his girlfriend, and try it had sell them over the internet to a belgium jim dealer, axel zimmerman. he's never been out, collecting rocks and trades them every monday night in the huge center where all of the guys in antwerp trade rocks. his hobby is a stick on a wooden bird and 100 foot pole and all of the men shoot at it with cross bows. this is the real sport. he seeing the add on the internet, i've got moon rocks for sale. he is the big believer in right and wrong. he called the fbi, he e-mailed the fbi. it became the big sting operation. thad roberts was taken down -- i always give it away. you know he got arrested. right. right. >> don't cross that line. >> right. >> you obviously have come off of enormous success with not only the books, but also the fact they then are converted to mo
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 4:00pm EDT
. [laughter] thanks for coming out tonight folks. i appreciate it. i've been here before big it's always a pleasure to be here at r.j. julia. i was here four years ago i think. tom clavin and i wrote together. i think tom was here two years ago for "the last stand of fox company." i think i may even recognize some of your faces in here. in fact, scheduled to be here but i wanted him to be her so badly that i trade him off. i trade him to discriminate your library or so again i say thank you. i like being here. for those people who do know our previous books, art previous collaborations, as you probably know tom and i would like to chronicle the adventures of ordinary men and extra ordinary circumstances. i like reading about generals as much as the next guy, but it is patent, i to come. the great, napoleon. whether it is montgomery. not so much montgomery. he is a great and i'm a good irishman. maybe we'll substitute. but i think you get my drift. but as much as i like reading about these great men, what i like writing about, what tom and i like researching about is the ordinary grunts.
CSPAN
Jul 3, 2011 8:00am EDT
culpable, that have gotten equally too big, too intertwined and too dangerous, frankly, for the public good, and we're not really addressing those. nor, by the way, are we really even doing much digging into what's gone on or what they've been involved with because there is a favorite whipping boy. >> thank you. >> but he's not, he's not defending goldman sachs. >> no, exactly. >> just so you know that. but -- >> what effect, if any, did repealing glass-steagall have on the crisis? [laughter] >> just a tiny little bit. [laughter] um, well, glass steigel, of course, was the depression-era law that served us very well for 66 years, i think it was. of course, they were, you know, the big financial institutions were chipping away at it for years. finally succeeded with the help of robert rubin to annihilate it altogether in the 1999. and there's a picture in the book of the signing of graham-leech-bliley which was the repeal of glass steigel, and everybody's smiling, and everybody's laughing, and greenspan is there clapping, and it's all a big love fest. and it really was the beginning of the e
CSPAN
Jul 10, 2011 9:00pm EDT
on that's really designed to do one big grand strategic thing that wherever you look in the middle east and that is to shore up the strength, the responsiveness of the state wherever we're looking, whether we're iraq or iran today or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from beginning to sell the idea of a two-state solution and they're all within this september of an international state system and we're going in the wrong direction. >> what i see on the ground and i travel often to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military, you have an incredibly competent military but in the end that's not enough to substitute for the poor governance that the afghanistan paid and the institutions provide. and so we're pushing businesses to walk uphill and we never get there and i'm sure you -- it's hard to find anybody to defend president karzai's governance. >> that's true, too. but good governance brings us back to something like the democratization, something like that procedure and it's going to be their own culture -- but it's going to be something the people will have a way
CSPAN
Jul 10, 2011 12:00pm EDT
account, even if i'm not logged in as a g-mail user? google is still doing this? >> guest: this is the big shift. google, one engineer told me they collect 57 different variables about people who even if you're not logged in, if you take a new laptop and put it on the desk right here, you can tell what kind of laptop is it, what kind of software is it running, what is the size of the fonts on this laptop, where is it located? what's the ip address? how long are you lingering before you click on a link? and all of these things can be used to make some guesses about what kind of person you are. there's mac and pc people, big font and small font people. all of this, then, allows you to make these guesses. they may not be, i mean, this may not be a very good portrait of you. it almost certainly isn't at that point. but you don't need that much in order to be able to do this with an increase in on the many iization. and -- opt myization. i talked to the people at hunch, and, you know, they said actually you need very little data in order to start to have a lot of predictive power. so five data
CSPAN
Jul 2, 2011 3:00pm EDT
aliens across the gulfstream from cuba into key west also a big part of the scene then and then cuba itself was locked in revolution. there was a right wing military dictator in power and there was a growing revolt and a lot of revolutionary activity and gun running. really an exciting time to be here in key west. he loved the fishing. he loved hispanic culture. he loved the real people here and the kind of hard-boiled life that they led dealing with these two cultures. in a transitional periods. >> each one of these programs was focusing on a particular work of this writer and we're dealing with the sun also rises in the modern library list of books at the end of the 20th. this was number 45 of the most influential novels of the century. for him which book was it? >> for hemingway it was his first novel. his very first book was a collection of short stories called in our time, which absolutely a groundbreaking book. one of the things we need to remember in hemingway, in a sense he really created literary modernism and brought it into the mainstream and clear prose that completely ov
CSPAN
Jul 9, 2011 11:00pm EDT
are prone to violence but have reported side to them. can you just -- >> yes. there was a big part of his persona. he wrote poetry. he was always described in personal dealings with him as generally considered far from as screen. not a pleasant person. is not a pleasant person to be a round ball. much more rigid, much more didactic. mind you, we're talking about the characters, somebody who planned to 9/11. that didn't want to push that went too far. in portraying osama bin laden it was important to get him right in see him as his acolyte who is going to put his life on the line for this plot would see him as an inspirational figure. that only makes sense because you're not seeing him when you are the reader. you aren't seeing him through the americans what do you been seeing it to the point of view of someone who is actually experiencing and has been inspired by him. you want to understand how that could possibly be. >> one of the things your characters from the west german least seven common is that they are having to use different identities. he has to change its name. the characters a
CSPAN
Jul 18, 2011 12:00am EDT
? nothing. [laughter] >> that is come back? you see the big picture. we use it more in the future but you are on the cutting edge of doing that. also, you did not know if you were going to see your purchase paper you trained for this sander there, but fell whole thing what do we do with the women in our unit? >> talk about that. it is the theme going through the book. >> guest: i joined the marine corps during peacetime to the understanding i would never really go to combat from the recruiters you will take the oath that honestly you will be sent to the work unit. >> but i took that seriously thinking if i do have to go to combat, i will do my duty. so in november 20,002,000,000 it started to come up with the idea we would go to iraq. my commanding officer pulls the two female officers and says look, by order of congress you are not allowed to go with us to combat because we will push ahead of the infantry and doing untraditional operations putting us ahead of a ground forces. i will fight to get you to kuwait i have told headquarters of the 13 that are going the unit will not be effectiv
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2011 6:00pm EDT
was covering it, it was big-time radio. yes, ma'am. >> and as far as the blacks, i saw one -- show on the history channel, which was about the final days of the war. they said there were a special groups, armies of blacks. didn't tell about the french, but just about the u.s. ones, that were supposedly poorly trained, poorly equiped and more or less made fools of themselvesth and that was reported that, oh, blacks can't fight. in the very end of the war. so that's another use or application of blacks there. >> yes, ma'am, thank you very much. we appreciate it. [applause] and up next on booktv, the writers discuss how governments can work together across national boundaries to resolve the world's issues. participants include toni morrison, salman rushdie and dale peck. this is part of the 2011 world voice festival held annually in new york city. it's just under three hours. >> okay. one of the things having this working day i am sure other people will join as the day goes on. one of the reasons for having it was to deflect 25, 26 years later after the mid 80's on some of the themes
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2011 12:00pm EDT
, wouldn't you say? you are, basically, you are seeping the big picture -- seeing the big picture of what's going on. that's unusual. you said we'll use it more in the future, but you were on the cutting edge of doing that. and you were also, you department know, did you, you didn't know whether you were actually going to get to see, going to participate. you had trained for this, you're there, you're move ago group that does this, but there's this whole thing about what do we do, we have women in our unit? talk a little bit about that because it's sort of a theme going through the book. >> guest: yeah, you know, okay. well, first of all, i joined the marine corpses during peacetime, so there was certainly understanding that i would never really go to combat according to what i had heard from the recruiters and other people that, oh, yeah, you're going to say the oath, but, you know, in all honesty you're going to be in some support unit. but when i said the oath, i really took that seriously, and i thought, well, you know, if i have to go to combat, i said the oath, and i'm going to do m
CSPAN
Jul 16, 2011 10:00pm EDT
character, our can-do spirit will be in jeopardy. none of the big challenges facing this country will successfully be faced. .. >> host: major jane blair, you are the first woman to write a book about your experience with respect to iraq. why? why would you want to write a book. >> guest: thanks for the question. i have a lot of reluctance about writing a book, being a marine. i think there there's a natural tendency to want to not highlight my experiences to just be a marine and not get involved in writing with all that. after i had -- i realized i had some incredible stories about marines in here that no one knows about, so i felt these allegations for me to paint his portrait of my time in iraq. and highlight the stories of other marines that i served with that i felt had done such incredible things and no one was talking about it. i thought i have to commit to this paper because all the stories are never going to get told if i don't. >> host: that is very interesting because our men and women who go to war, they rarely discuss what they have seen, and so it is really interest
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2011 9:00pm EDT
were basically seeing the big picture of what's going on. that's unusual. we use it more, we will use it more in the future, but you were on the cutting edge of doing that, and you didn't know, did you? you didn't know if you were going to get to see and produce pete -- you trade for this, you're there and moving a group that does this, but there's this whole thing about what do we do, we have women in the unit comes atop a little bit about that because it is a theme going through the book. >> guest: first all i joined the marine corps during peacetime and so there was certainly the understanding that i would never go to combat according to what i had heard from the recruiters and of the people that you are going to save the oats, but in all honesty your going to be in some support unit and when i said the notes i took that seriously, and i thought if i have to go to combat a said the oath and i'm going to do my duty and to that so come november, 22, my unit starts coming up with this idea we are going to go to iraq and my commanding officer i mentioned in the book this story but he p
CSPAN
Jul 30, 2011 8:00am EDT
of people in this room. it is too big to discuss these important matters. this was at the essex house hotel. what he suggested after the session was find a room in the hotel and i will undertake to be there with no time limit to discuss whatever you want to discuss. immediately defeating the protest completely because nobody wanted to do that. that shut her up. there was a big quarrel between representing -- grace paley representing the views of female delegates that they were seriously underrepresented on the panels which was true. she got into a quarrel with norman mailer which led to his remark that he hadn't set up this congress to be put away by grace paley which led to grace paley being on the front page of the new york post. that is quite an achievement which she could not have expected. also led to sun tag and border -- susan's on deck remarked literature was not an equal opportunity employer which didn't go down at all well. susan didn't care. there was a big fight, saul bellow -- one of my favorite memories was the opening ceremony was that the public library and because norman ma
CSPAN
Jul 10, 2011 9:30am EDT
. that was a big part of bin laden's persona. he wrote poetry. and he is, he was always described in personal dealings with him as, you know, rather gentle and con said rate -- considerate, far from a screamer. zawahiri, i gather, is not a pleasant person to be around at all. much more rigid, much more didactic, mind you, we're talking about opposing characters who planned 9/11, so i don't want to push that one too far. but i think in portraying bin laden it was important to get him right and see him as his act colite who was going to put his life on the line for this plot would see him, as an inspirational figure. that only makes sense. because you're not seeing him when you're the reader. you're not seeing him through the americans' point of view, you're seeing him from the point of view from someone who's actually been inspired by him, and you want to understand how that could possibly be. >> and one of the things your characters from the west or the middle east have in common is that they're having to use different identities. brooke chandler, you know -- >> yeah. >> -- has to change his
CSPAN
Jul 11, 2011 12:00am EDT
that's going on that really are designed to be one big branch stray teemingic thing wherever you look in the middle east, and that is to shore up the strength, the responsiveness of the state wherever they look, whether with iraq or iraq today or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from continuing to sell the idea of a two-state solution for israel and palestine are all within the concept of the international space system. that is, we don't have strong systems and things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground when i travel often to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military, we have an up credibly well-led military, but in the end that's not enough to substitute for the poor government there is and the institutions provide, and it's like, you know, we're pushing this rock uphill and we just never quite get there. i'm sure you wouldn't disagree and it's hard to find anybody to defend president karzai's government. >> guest: that's true too. it brings us back to democratization and that procedure and it will be their own culture, but it'
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2011 12:00pm EDT
, that is in the middle of a huge complex, building, helping, developing projects that really is designed to one big grand strategic thing. were every look in the middle east, and that is to shore up the strength, the responsiveness of the state. wherever we are looking whether it is with iraq or iran today, or afghanistan, to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail. the idea of a two-state solution for israel and palestine, and they are all within the concept of this international state. that is, we don't have strong response of state. things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground, and i travel often to afghanistan, is to be honest, with all the power of the u.s. military, we have an incredibly confident and well led military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the governance that the afghans and institutions provide. and so it's like, you know, pushing a rock up a hill. we just never quite get there. i'm sure you wouldn't disagree. it's hard to find anybody, -- >> guest: that is true. but good governance brings us back to something like democratization. somethin
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2011 11:00am EDT
in their national interest. so there is this big divide between the western part of nato and the central and eastern europeans. just quickly on libya, which you may have some questions on later , you know, i keep thinking that this whole libyan war was set up for the argument. i know that is not true. one of the biggest reasons for nato is standardization. we have always said ultimately nato, people can fight together, standards. well, reading last week that the nato allies were running out of laser-guided bombs. well, we have plenty of them. this big american carrier. guess what? they don't fit on british and french attack aircraft. i was stunned to learn that because i thought, if nothing else, we have been practicing. you know, doing all these things. i'm going to switch gears and go to you, but out tell you, this idea came from, the u.s. navy invited me a couple of years ago to watch carrier operations. i was on board one of our atomic nuclear power carriers. that is somehow fit, how tell you. what they do on those carriers is just out of this world. i was having dinner. on one side of me -- thi
CSPAN
Jul 10, 2011 11:30am EDT
one third of 2008 and one-third of 2009 and a big chunk of 2009 and last year i was there for the july for the kabul conference and i was there in december about seven months pregnant working on maternal health stories. >> host: that wasn't a great way to engage with the women because of common experience. now your career as a political television producer for abc. how did you make the transition from that to writing this book? >> guest: very carefully. [laughter] i left abc, and i left abc. you've had a lot of my former boss is on and i know your colleagues at c-span since i was watching, and i left because i knew that there were so many stories i wanted to do that i wouldn't get to do the way the news places were going, and i really care that economic development stories and under told stories, and the stories of the women in war or just almost never told. if i save war story you think about the west which are all the incredible books but the lead out so many people. and these women are the ones who make sure there's a community to go back to when the war is over. >> host: and is cam
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2011 8:00pm EDT
impacted by the rise of big bucks superstores so it would be interesting to see what they could do not just as borders retracts fifth and closes up shops as barnes & noble transitions into a digital format. >> what is the fiscal health of barnes & noble? >> that is in an interesting spot. record sales but because they spend so much money in terms of developing the know quote wind and the digital business they had to suspend the dividend for the last two quarters. wall street has not been entirely happy about this. there were also in the process of trying to sell themselves as of one year-ago in in early may, liberty media which is owned by john malone put in of bid at $17 a share and that is considered in the company is doing to diligence but it remains to be seen there are some favorable signs and also spoken highly of each other in the media, at this point*, perhaps not of up in the air but hardly a done deal. >> tell us about the publishers marketplace and if people want to follow you? >> i am a news editor for publishers marketplace which owns publishers lunch which reaches 40,000 subsc
CSPAN
Jul 30, 2011 7:00pm EDT
three instances, there are more, but those are three big ones where, again, no clear authority by the constitution but no pro hicks in the constitution for the -- but no prohibition in the constitution to do so and where the vital security of the united states was at stake. i'll close on this: i believe this is just like those times. the security, the future improvement of the united states, and future generations depend upon the president taking this action, boldly and forthrightly, to preserve the integrity and to make sure that the obligations and the full faith and credit of the united states is not questioned. madam president, i yield the floor. a senator: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from indiana. mr. coats: madam president, thank you. i wonder if i could ask how much time is allocated? i know we're a little oust kill tear with the -- we're a little out of kilter with the allocation of time. how much time do i have to speak and i want to make sure my colleagues have sufficient time to speak also. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the
CSPAN
Jul 9, 2011 10:00pm EDT
projects going on designed to do one big strategic thing wherever you look in the middle east and that is to shore up the strength and responsiveness of the state's wherever we look whether it's iraq or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail, the idea of the two-stage solution for israel and palestine or all within the concept of the system and if we don't have strong response things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground and a travel to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military you have an incredibly confident will lead military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the government's of the afghan states and institutions provide and and pushing we just never quite get there. it's hard to find anybody -- >> guest: that's true, too. this brings us back to something like democratization and the culture in their view is going to be something where the people will have a way if you change those that are going to run their government. this is something you can't avoid. when the figures for you don't pu
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2011 12:00pm EDT
the state of pennsylvania has come in and said defaulting on the debt is not that big a deal. it can be, quote in his words, easily managed. does the senator from arizona agree with that thinking? mr. mccain: as the senator may know, i came to the floor a couple of days ago and made that comment, and the senator from illinois and i are in agreement, point number one. you can prioritize -- i think the senator and every economist i know literally would agree. you can prioritize for awhile where you want what remaining money is left. but the message you send to the world, not just our markets but to the world, that the united states of america is going to default on its debts is a totally unacceptable scenario and beneath a great nation. we are in agreement, number one. mr. durbin: amen. mr. mccain: number two is that to insist, to insist that any agreement is based on the passage through the united states senate of a balanced budget amendment to the constitution of the united states, as i said before, is not fair to the american people because, because the terrible obstructionists on this
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 12:00am EDT
and recycling to make snow for people to ski on, and this was a big conflict over it, and the lack of understanding of what is sacred was shown when the forest service said, well, exactly where is the line where the mountain ceases to be sacred as if there's a spot where you can say this is sacred, this is not sacred, so, yes, we're still marginalized. >> host: when it comes to policy, what influence do native americans have here in washington? >> guest: not enough. not enough. >> host: lip lip -- linda hogan is our guest, and first call comes from gregg in cleveland. >> caller: hi, linda. >> guest: hello, graying. >> caller: part of my question is a comment and had has to do the political side there, but i really feel that americans have this tremendous burden of guilt for the way we decimated the natives, and i think that the americans are far worse than hitler ever was, so why do you think that the black people have more political strength than the natives do and are able to seemingly bring themselves more up in of the western society? >> guest: there are a lot of things to resp
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)